Author Topic: Impossible Visits.  (Read 4823 times)

Offline catseyes

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Impossible Visits.
« on: February 20, 2010, 02:03:43 PM »
The second of my 2 best books on Bigfoot for a long time.

Impossible Visits by Christopher Noel.

The inside story of interactions with sasquatch at habituation sites.
Its about people who have come to know the intelligent fringe and forest dweller.  They consider that they have a relationship with a creature much closer to an ancient human than to an ape.  They believe that these creatures have co existed with us for eons, our 2 spiecies crossing paths rarely.  This book is about these interactions.

These people are just down to earth farm folk, who have lived and shared their farms/homes/woods, sometimes for several generations with the bigfoot people.  When you read the stories in their own words and through their own experiences you can see why it is we don't hear about it.  They protect these areas and clans from outsiders, and for good reason. 

This is a fabulous book to read, and really understand how it is that so many still believe these creatures to be mythical.  A must read.

Got it from Amamzon...around $20 US from memory.


Offline BLiSsFuL~*

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2010, 07:26:42 PM »
I seen a documentry on people who claim they share their land, farms and homes with the bigfoot it was very interesting.
I ALwAyS ReALiSe I SeEn It CoMmInG AfTer
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Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2010, 12:44:50 PM »
I have a slight problem with this.   

The books have alerted the world to the existence of the sasquatch, and this exposure alone has potentially endangered them.  Anyone truly wishing to nurture and protect them would probably not take a course of action that could endanger them.  You'd think.   

Being sasquatch, I assume the stories possibly come from Canadian farmers and/or First Nation indigenous people.   And bearing in mind the following: 

Quote
They protect these areas and clans from outsiders, and for good reason. 
   
.......has the author betrayed their trust by exposing this to the world? 

I have a niggling feeling that the people who interact with the sasquatch didn't know the world was going to find out about the relationship they've had with sasquatch for generations - and which they've kept secret from outsiders in the hope of protecting them.   

My analogy is that if I learned of a 'secret' place in the Southern Ocean where the whales go - I wouldn't write a book about it because you'd have extra whaling ships turning up down there to exploit the new-found knowledge.   

I just have a reasonable amount of mistrust for the motives of anyone who stands to gain financially - an authors do.   

Offline catseyes

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2010, 06:48:30 PM »
Actually the author does not betray the whereabouts of the Sasquatch.  The locations are never mentioned other than as a state.  And no, they do not come from Canada.  That is a common mistake people make.  The Bigfoot people are found throughout the United States and down through South America.   Only one subject in the book was indigenous to the States.  These people are common, run of the mill, nothing special people, except for the fact they know what is in the woods.

The majority of people will never believe in Bigfoot without a corpse on a slab.  For those of us who do believe it is good to know that these people who do habituate with Bigfoot have never been physically harmed.  By reading the book you can recognize the sign that they are around and maybe make the world a little bit safer for them ourselves.  If I found sign or was lucky enough to see one down at my river I wouldn't tell a soul.  Wild horses wouldn't drag it from me.  They have survived this long dispite us.  Hopefully they will still be here when we are long gone.

I am grateful this book was written, or I would never have known that these interactions occur.  If I am ever lucky enough to ever experience something like this I will know I am not alone.


Offline lotsakids

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2010, 09:04:03 PM »
sounds like a great book

One day my light went out, but was blown again into flame by an encounter with some wonderful people I call friends. I owe the deepest thanks to those who have rekindled this inner light...
[inspired by Albert Schweitzer]

Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2010, 08:52:38 AM »
Just wondered because Sasquatch is the Canadian name for Bigfoot.

Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2010, 08:54:12 AM »
http://www.unmuseum.org/bigfoot.htm
Bigfoot of North America
If the Himalayas of Asia has it's Yeti, the Pacific Northwest of America has it's Bigfoot: A hairy, ape-like, biped that stands seven to nine feet tall and weighs between 600 and 900 pounds.

Bigfoot, or as it's often called in Canada, the Sasquatch, is mentioned in several native American legends. In fact, the term "Sasquatch" is Indian for "hairy giant." The first sighting of a Sasquatch by a white man apparently came in 1811 near what now is the town of Jasper, Alberta Canada. A trader named David Thompson found some strange footprints, fourteen inches long and eight inches wide, with four toes, in the snow.


Offline nick61

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2010, 09:38:49 AM »
All is fair in pursuit of the mighty dollar. I wouldn't worry though, if these claims are creditable the government would of sectioned the area off, much like area 51. If it exists and they haven't a clue, hide it. 61
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Offline catseyes

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2010, 02:37:07 PM »
There are litter ally 30 or 40 names for Bigfoot/Sasquatch throughout America.  Skunk Ape, Boggy Creek Creature are a couple more.  Actually Sasquatch was my terminology not the authors.  He refers to them as Bigfoot, I tend to use Sasquatch because I think Bigfoot conjures up a cartoon character in peoples heads.


Offline Alien88

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2010, 12:11:54 AM »

I really hope Sasquatch / Yowie are harmless to people because I have heard of an incident where a Yowie chased and knocked down someone who was researching them in QLD.  I have visited the website of this researcher and he seemed very credible, unlikes others I have seen.





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Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2010, 08:47:21 AM »
I think any species needs survival skills. 

In a 'perfect' world, Yowies and people would get along and respect each other.   

However, on this bizarre rock that we call Planet Earth, respect has long since disappeared.  Many humans don't even respect other humans.  If you consider what some humans do to each other, it should be no surprise that they would inflict equal or worse treatment on other species.   

Whilst the Researcher may have had good intentions ...... the next human that walks along the path might be a nutjob with an air rifle - like the one who shot and killed a koala a couple of months ago. 

I'd say that any reaction from a Yowie would be only in the interests of self-preservation or to protect its family.  Apparently they don't hunt people and it would seem they try to keep to themselves. 

The North American Indians and First Nation (Indian) Peoples of Canada have great respect for all creatures so I have no trouble believing that interaction could take place under such respectful circumstances.  And I have no doubt those people would keep it to themselves, and would only hand down the information within their cultural teachings to their young people.     

You can bet that if Yowies were discovered here in sufficient numbers, some enterprising chef would dream up ways of serving them on a plate to tourists - under the guise of cullling their numbers because they are taking over the country ..... or some other well-worn excuse. 

Personally I enjoy the idea that the Yowies are out there somewhere, minding their own business, while keeping our fascination alive by their ingenious ways of dodging contact with the human species.  Clever critters!   :D

Offline catseyes

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2010, 10:20:32 PM »
From what I have read, I would like to see what would happen to a nutjob with a riffle,  Research seems to indicate that they move in family groups, almost never alone.  While our nutjob was focusing for the one infront of him it would already be too late.  I have seen interviews where big tuff hunters actually shake and stutter when discussing their sightings LOL.

Alien, there seems to be a difference, from what I see, between our Yowie and the others in the US, etc.  Yowies can be aggressive, Springbock(sp) comes to mind.  I have heard of injuries occurring, yes.

It has been suggested that it maybe because the indigenous peoples here made war on them, which as far as I know didn't happen in the US.   That may have conditioned them to be more violent then their oversees rallies.


Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2010, 08:43:08 AM »
That sounds like a good possibility CE.

Also, I wonder if our indigenous people had less food at certain times (drought, flood or seasonal changes in the harsh Australian climate) and the yowi became a food source.  Or, visa versa - the yowie's food supply may have been depleted at certain times (due to the same causes), so I wonder did they come to regard humans as 'good eating' and easy prey, out of necessity? - which may have resulted in the indigenous people retaliating and 'making war' on them.  (Thinking of how Chimps were thought to be vegetarian for a long time, until someone observed them killing and eating meat.) 

Curiosities?:  Isn't it strange when people say they've been attacked by dogs, snakes, sharks or spiders or jellyfish, its all over the TV and newspapers, regardless of whether the offending dog, snake, shark, spider or jellyfish is actually accounted for. 

Yet, when someone reports being injured/threatened/frightened by a yowie, the news will usually only appear on a few specific websites for yowie enthusiasts, and it's poo-hoo-ed by the rest.   Point being, you can have two dots on your leg and 'say' a snake bit you, and its a media story.  No snake, no proof - but no one seems to care.  But dare to talk about a yowie, and everyone wants proof.   Is that not 'two sets of rules'?     

I think a penalty should be given to people who create hoaxes concerning the yowie or their counterparts worldwide.  They should at least be charged with being a 'public nuisance'.   Perhaps if there was something to deter such fools, the genuine people who do have something worthwhile they wish to report may be more inclined to come forward. 

I've been to Springbrook many times. It's a beautiful, pristine mountain area.  Frankly, if I saw anything unusual in the bush, I'd hesitate to say anything about it because it would turn into a circus of media or wannabe yowie hunters converging on the place with their cameras.   (And then there'd be the nutjob with the cardboard cut-outs of large footprints, marauding around making 'tracks' in the dirt).   

I'm pleased the author didn't reveal the whereabouts of his story sources. 

Offline catseyes

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Re: Impossible Visits.
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2010, 07:09:36 PM »
That sounds like a good possibility CE.

Also, I wonder if our indigenous people had less food at certain times (drought, flood or seasonal changes in the harsh Australian climate) and the yowi became a food source.  Or, visa versa - the yowie's food supply may have been depleted at certain times (due to the same causes), so I wonder did they come to regard humans as 'good eating' and easy prey, out of necessity? - which may have resulted in the indigenous people retaliating and 'making war' on them.  (Thinking of how Chimps were thought to be vegetarian for a long time, until someone observed them killing and eating meat.) 


Its quite possible that they were competing for the same food supplies.  Yowies pretty much eat anything as do people.  They are also very clever hunters, from reports and very smart.

I think the only way to protect them is to acknowledge,ledge them and sadly that puts them at risk.  Catch 22, I guess.


 


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