Author Topic: Big Black cat in rural NSW  (Read 6660 times)

Offline hannalee

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Big Black cat in rural NSW
« on: July 30, 2009, 12:50:44 PM »

So I have heard there has been sighted a Panther roaming around between Muswellbrook and Denman.  It has been coming up more and more lately, form more different people.  I can't exactly remember what happened.  But they reckon that there was a circus with heading towards Denman or heading towards Muswellbrook along Denman road and there was an accident with the truck that was carrying the cats and I think that the Panther Cage broke and there was I think what everyone reckons there was 5 panthers that got out.  Apparently it was a family of panthers.  I don't know how true it is.  But the thought of it is pretty cool.

Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2009, 01:20:40 PM »
Wow, if 5 escaped, they could account for a considerable new panther population.   

Offline catseyes

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2009, 01:53:32 PM »
I  believe the escaped panther story to be an urban legend.   People use it to try and explain the phenomenon.


Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2009, 11:01:57 PM »
Personally I hope that the big cats - wherever they are - stay there, and do not become more prolific.  We don't need more predators to rip up live stock and native creatures.   The feral cat problem is bad enough, without some larger predator pest to wipe out more of our native animals and birds.  An extra predator like a big cat, is not a natural course of events.  Its a pest just like foxes, camels and so on. 

I hate the idea of not being able to go on bush walks in our beautiful country because of the concern of being attacked by a big cat.  We're used to the idea of snakes and spiders that could kill us, but I hope we never have to get used to the idea of big cats in close proximity where they could become pests as predators or a danger to people.  In fact I doubt that would ever happen, because they are not native animals, so they will be hunted down and killed as pests anyway, the minute they poke their head out.   

I think there's a very ordinary explanation for any big cats that are around, such as humans who liked to keep exotic animals cooped up as pets, and predictably some would escape - just as easily as other animals escape, or are set free.  Camels, foxes, buffalo, for instance.  I don't think any of them are a mystery but they definitely all are pests.   

Offline catseyes

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2009, 11:21:08 PM »
In the USA, there are pumas and bears to contend with when you hike or bush walk.  It doesn't deter most people from using the forests.  I think once people get over the initial shock of knowing they are there, they will still use our national parks regardless.


Offline Salt Breeze

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2009, 10:06:04 AM »
Sadly, I think it will be the big cats who'll get the shock when they have a bullet or two lodged in them.  Expecting our live stock farmers to embrace the idea of big cats is something that I don't think is likely to happen because they're the ones finding mangled dead stock on their properties.   

I think its worth remembering, for example, that when people report a burglar or intruder in their home they frequently exaggerate the height and weight of the person because they were scared at the time of seeing them, so it all becomes 'larger than life'.  Its a common phenomena that people exaggerate stories out of fear.  Police are aware that people may say the culprit was about 6 feet tall, but in reality the culprit turns out to be considerably shorter when they are arrested.   

With that common exaggeration in mind, perhaps a lot of big cat sightings are exactly that.  Maybe some people are just seeing big feral cats, and they are momentarily scared so it becomes a mountain lion or a panther to them.  Obviously feral cats make a louder noise than house cats, and have larger paws - so larger tracks, and do larger droppings.   

Regarding the big cats reported in Australia, there's no reason to think that their IQ is any greater than any other big cat.  They eat, sleep and poo.   People are able to trap feral cats, so what's so difficult about setting up a camera in places where the big cats are allegedly often seen or where they have repeatedly killed live-stock?  Animals tend to remain where their food source is, and it's been proven time and time again, that animals can be lured out caught with food in a trap.  I think that some folk would prefer not to try and lure them out in Australia, because they are afraid the whole thing is not real, and it would tend to destroy the local legend if the big cat didn't turn up.     

Man can go into outer space, and travel down into the deep oceans, and venture into areas of countries where big cats commonly live, and no one seems to have much trouble in tracking them down - which is proven by the number of documentaries there are.  What's so difficult about tracking down the big cats here - considering they've been at this 'big cat' issue for decades


Offline Casaly

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2011, 10:36:51 PM »
I never heard this and I like like an hour from Denman. Kind of scary but that would be so horrible for the live stock! I love my cows...

Offline Colleen

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2011, 11:31:19 AM »
It is always the humans who cause this problem, we cannot blame the animals.  These animals are only
trying to survive.  I know it must be terrible if other animals or people are hurt, but it is an instinct for survival. 
These poor animals are there because cruel people have dumped them and then they are left to die a horrific death of starvation or try to survive and fend for themselves.  I have only compassion for these rejected and often ill
animals who have to try to survive like this and then also to be hunted down for just trying to live.
Stop the torture. Stop Yulin. Become the voice of animals who cannot talk.

Offline Casaly

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Re: Big Black cat in rural NSW
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2011, 03:28:32 PM »
Like that lovely hippo who was living in the NT for years before he/she was shot dead by drunken pig hunters, so sad...

 


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