Author Topic: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA  (Read 161 times)

Offline KANACKI

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Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« on: January 07, 2022, 11:09:28 AM »
Does the ghost of a suffocated train driver haunt the old abandoned tunnel?

Since its construction in 1895 began, the Swan View Tunnel has been riddled with problems. There are rumors that many perished while the tunnel was being built, though more dark events would transpire after the official opening. It turned out, some miscalculations of the 340-meter long tunnel had been made. The tunnelís opening was too tight and the incline it was built upon was too steep to mesh well with the type of trains that were to pass through it.

to be continued.....

Kanacki

Offline KANACKI

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Re: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2022, 11:10:12 AM »
From 1896, many trains passing through the tunnel would fill with smoke and steam from the engine, since it had nowhere else to go. The most terrifying part about this was that it caused those on board to asphyxiate and oftentimes, pass out. 1903 would see the first extremely serious incident along the tunnel, where a train passing through Swan View had slowed to walking pace, causing those on board to slowly suffocate and lose consciousness, with the train creeping through the tunnel ever so slowly. Both drivers and around 20 firefighters on board lost consciousness and sadly, one of the drivers also lost his life.

to be continued.....

Kanacki

Offline KANACKI

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Re: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2022, 11:12:44 AM »
Eventually, at the turn of the 1960s, the Swan View Tunnel was disused and another route was forged. Given the dark and ghastly history that this tunnel possesses, itís no wonder why ghost stories have swirled about this location.

Many people claim that the Swan View Tunnel is one of the most haunted places in Perth. Taking a brief look at the tunnelís history, it is easy to see why so many ghost stories have formed about this location. Ghost tours have even made their way through the area in the past!

Some to visit have claimed to sight visual anomalies that cannot be explained, such as self-illuminated balls of light traveling through the tunnel. Other ghostly activity to be reported includes, hearing strange noises and even being overcome with sudden physiological sensations that fall in line with the tunnelís past of asphyxiation.

Kanacki

Offline KANACKI

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Re: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2022, 11:36:41 AM »
For those guests who cannot see the pictures I suggest signing up to this wonderful forum as you will have an amazing visual insight into haunted places in Australia and much more.

The pictures below shows inside the tunnel where strange lights have been seen and so people encounter choking sensations.

Kanacki



Offline KANACKI

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Re: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2022, 12:30:11 PM »
in the the Following newspaper Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Saturday 26 November 1932, page 4

reported the following.....

TRAGEDIES AND MISHAPS ACCIDENT IN TUNNEL BODY HURTLES FROM CARRIAGE PERTH. November SB.

When the Albany express train ms proceeding through a long tunnel in the Darling Range near Swanvlew
last night  the engine driver saw the body of a man hurtle from one of the carriage Into the tunnel. The train was stopped and after a search being made George Fletcher, aged 80, was found unconscious suffering from grave head Injuries. His condition Is critical.

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Re: Haunted Swan View Tunnel: Perth: WA
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2022, 12:53:03 PM »
West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Thursday 10 December 1942, page 7 newspaper reported the following.....


SWAN VIEW SMASH. ENGINE-DRIVER'S DEATH.

The Dangers of the Tunnel. That the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning is an ever present danger to train crews, and even to whole train loads of passengers, passing through the Darling Range tunnel was shown by medical and other ex pert testimony at an inquest in the Midland Junction Courthouse yesterday. The inquest concerned the death of Spencer Trobridge Beer (44), married, of First-avenue, Mt Lawley, the driver of the second engine of a runaway double-header goods train which got out of swan view tunnel death son in the tunnel shortly after mid night on November 5 and, rushing downhill at terrific speed, crashed into a dead-end about 250 yards on the Perth side of Swan View station.

At the conclusion of evidence, the Coroner (Mr J. F. McMillan, SM) said he had no doubt whatever that the deceased died from the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, but that he would reserve his finding with a view to adding a suitable rider. The Coroner was assisted by Sgt A. Washer. Inspector J. H. P. Simpson appeared for the Commis sioner of Railways, Mr C. A. Gough for the Railway Employees' Union and to watch the interests of the guard, Percy Cornelius O'Sullivan and Mr J. Dunphy appeared for the relatives of the deceased.

Bert Wilfred Buttsworth, medical practitioner of Midland Junction, said he went to the scene of the accident shortly after it occurred. He first went to the fireman of the first engine, Clement Frederick Dove, who was in a state of semi collapse, supporting himself by holding on to the side of the engine. He was suffering from burns to the face, hands, body and thigh. The driver, David Robertson, was lying on the floor of the engine apparently just regaining consciousness. He also had burns on the face. Witness considered both men were suffering from the effects of heat and carbon monoxide poisoning.

When he came to the second engine he found the driver, Beer, and the fire man, Percy Griffiths, lying on the floor of the engine side by side. Beer was dead and Griffiths was unconscious and had a bruised forehead. The deceased had no serious external injury. Fireman Griffiths's manner of recovery and his statements made it obvious that both men had been suffering from carbon. Midland Junction Courthouse yes monoxide poisoning.

Doctor's Trial Trip. Dr Buttsworth said he had subsequently made a trial trip through the tunnel on an engine pulling a relatively light load. It was an easy trip through the tunnel lasting 21 minutes. The amount of carbon monoxide in the blood under those conditions increased by over 10 per cent. He thought double header trains were definitely unsafe.

There was no ventilation in the tunnel so far as he knew. Dr Alexander Thomas Hicks Jolly, of Midland Junction, who conducted a post-mortem examination of the body of deceased, stated that the cause of death was carbon monoxide poisoning. He was present on the Midland Junction Courthouse yesterday trial trip through the tunnel.

 There was a definite increase of from 10 to 20 per cent of carbon monoxide In the blood as a result. If there were any undue delay in the tunnel, it might cause a serious accident. The practice of using double-headers through the tunnel should be dis continued. In the case of a passenger train being delayed in the tunnel, all the passengers might be involved in the effects of the fumes. J. C. Hood, analyst, said an examination of the blood of the deceased disclosed that it was saturated with carbon monoxide.

Actually analysis showed that the poison was present to the extent of swan view tunnel deaths from 60 to 65 per cent. Normally there should be little or none. Some authorities considered that between 60 and 80 per cent was sufficient to cause death, but that would depend upon other circumstances such as the deficiency in oxygen. David Robertson, driver of the leading engine, said that the vacuum brake connection between the two engines became disconnected at the Swan View crossing where they were stopped while the matter was rectified. The train proceeded and entered the tunnel at a speed of about 4 to 5 .miles per hour. The engines were hauling a load of 431 tons 14 tons under the maximum.

Both engines were labouring and slipping. It was usual to get through the tunnel in 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. After that amount of time had elapsed he began to feel the effects of the heat and fumes. He saw Fireman Dove collapse. Presently he collapsed him self and did not remember anything more. The tunnel was 11 chains 19 links long and there was a pretty steep grade. He had bad times in it before. The only means of communication between the crews of the two engines was by whistle. He always used a wet towel over his face when going through the tunnel He thought it safer to split trains than to use double-headers.

Fireman's Experience. Percy Growths, fireman the second engine with Beer, said that the trap of the engine floor was raised to admit fresh air. They had not got far into the tunnel when he found breathing difficult. He used a wet towel and knelt on the floor. He got up to see how the pressure gauge was and collapsed. He came to for a moment and saw Beer kneeling on the floor with his hand over his face and then remembered nothing more. According to the guard, O'Sullivan, there were 53 trucks and a brake van in the train.

 He said the van did not enter the tunnel When the train started to run back he waited until the engines should have been clear of the tunnel and then applied the hand brake unsuccess fully. He then jumped out. The acting-secretary of the Loco motive Engine Drivers, Firemen and Cleaners' Union (Mr C. H. Webb) told the Coroner that his union had protested against the use of double-headers through the tunnel The union had asked the Com missioner of Railways to suspend them until the result of the departmental inquiry was known, but the request had been refused.

In his opinion more risk attached to the crew of the second engine. If there was any difficulty encountered, there was liable to be confusion' between the crews of the two engines. The union had records of instances of members having collapsed before when going through the tunnel.

Kanacki

 


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