Author Topic: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS  (Read 3544 times)

Offline KANACKI

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Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« on: January 05, 2016, 01:56:00 PM »
Some people claim stay overnight at the Bush Inn in New Norfolk, a tiny town on the Derwent River in the southeast of Tasmania, and you’re setting yourself up for one very terrifying experience.
Australia’s oldest continuously licensed hotel will turn 200 this year, but there’s one “person” in the 26-room hotel that never gets any older.

The spooky hotel on Montagu Street is said to house a ghost resembling a small girl in room six. As well as a haunted room, there’s a hidden tunnel underneath the pub that was used to transport the patients from the Derwent River to the Royal Derwent Hospital (originally New Norfolk Insane Asylum), so they wouldn’t be seen on the public streets.

To be continued...

Kanacki

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2016, 01:58:13 PM »
Current leasee of The Bush Inn, Don Smith, says all the rooms in his New Norfolk pub, opened in 1815 and first licensed in 1825, contain old, high beds and baths. But room six, “the ghost room”, simply has a small single bed and a chair in the corner. It’s believed that a little girl fell down the stairs at the Bush Inn nearly 200 years ago, Mr Smith said.

You can see a picture of inside the Ghost room 6 below.

To be cont....


Kanacki

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2016, 02:01:14 PM »
The tunnel is allegedly went from the cellar to the asylum.  I have not verified if that was true but interesting all the same. this doorway allegedly leads to the tunnel in the picture below.

to be continued...

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2016, 02:09:49 PM »
The inn today is run by two brothers by the last name of Smith in picture below.

“The first night I stayed here I was by myself,” Mr Smith said. “I didn’t get much sleep that night — there were a lot of creaky noises, floor boards making a noise, a lot of walking around and there was no one else staying here, it was only me.”

Mr Smith, who describes himself as someone who is not easily spooked, said strange things happen regularly at the Inn. “I’ve seen someone walk past and then I’ve looked and no one is there.
“And one night the bell rang in the kitchen and no one was there — someone must have rang it.”

But rather than putting people off, Mr Smith said people travel to the Bush Inn especially to experience room six.“People come here and ask to stay in the ghost room,” he said.Mr Smith said a group of paranormal investigators has visited and they discovered plenty of “ghost orbs”, which are said to be the souls of people.

”We had the ghost busters come from Victoria — they spent the night here and were up filming until about 3am.”They found a lot of orbs on the walls in different rooms upstairs and down stairs.”
The long and rich history of the pub is displayed on the walls of the building in the form of photographs and plaques.

The Smith brother gave a long description of the i9nn history. It was named after DW Bush, the clerk of Reverend “Bobby” Knopwood, who was the first chaplain in the colony. The first licensee of the Inn was Ann Bridger, a 54-year-old widow, who arrived in Hobart in 1823 with two daughters and a son.

There are signs on the wall commemorating the first telephone call in the Commonwealth, which was made from the hotel in 1888 — just 10 years after Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. The Bush Inn’s phone number up until the 1970s was simply 1, Mr Smith said.

The most internationally famous Bush Inn guest was undoubtedly singer Dame Nellie Melba who went there for rest during her 1924 farewell visit to Tasmania.

Undoubtedly a typical country Inn with a long history. But is it haunted I let you decide?

Perhaps a night in room 6 might answer that question.

Kanacki

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2016, 10:49:52 AM »
Strange this story of the ghost in  room 6? In searching to find any historical evidence to support these claims of this alleged death of a girl? There has been no records that come to light supporting this claim. Death and accidents like this one was reported in historic newspapers all the time. So for me the story of young girl falling down the stair is one those urban myths attached itself to the alleged haunting of the pub.

Indeed one should ask if there was any traumatic event that could be associated with the Bush Inn resulting in death?

Well there was one associated with the pub the death of young servant girl from nearby house. One of the alleged murders was staying at the pub. Possibly room 6?

It was sadly a very controversial court case back in 1843.

To be continued....

Kanacki

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2016, 11:12:45 AM »
Indeed climbing the stairs of the Bush inn you are climbing in the footsteps of history. However the question remains who or what could of been the catalyst for this alleged haunting?

Is the site subject to stone tape ghost recordings wrongly attributed to this urban myth of a young girl falling down the stairs?

The following newspaper account tells of the strange death of a young servant girl by the name of Jane Saunders. There was conflicting reports of the events leading to her death. Her body was found in river near the Inn. She had a mark on her cheek and one report claimed she had a handkerchief stuffed in her mouth. After the body was removed from the river the corpse turned black with beginning of purification before the body was examined by a doctors so it did not help the then doctor examining the body to come to conclusion of what actually caused death?

It was speculated that it could of been strangulation, suffocation or accidental drowning or death from a blow to the head?

to be continued...

Kanacki

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2016, 02:02:29 PM »
It was indeed one of the most unusual death inquests in Tasmanian history. I still looking for a newspaper story with judgement outcome of inquest of the death of Jane Saunders.

To be continued


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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2022, 08:42:26 AM »
My apologies for taking so long to update this story.

Hobart Town Advertiser (Tas. : 1839 - 1861), Tuesday 4 February 1845, page 2 Newspaper reported the Following.

NEW NORFOLK MURDER. —————

The inquest has sat upon the unhappy victim of unbridled passion, and the result has been a verdict of Wilful Murder against Isaac Lockwood, the waiter at the Bush Inn ; and against Thomas Green, cook ; and William Taylor, ostler ; as accessories. All three are prisoners of the crown, probationers. The dreadful catastrophe is a fearful warning of the impossibility of men intent upon the commission of crime venturing lo say thus far will I go, and no farther.

Murder did not evidently enter into the contemplation of the miscreants when they planned the violation of the unhappy girl. It was the result, but the accidental one, of the violence contemplated and attempted to be carried into effect.

In endeavouring to effect their unhallowed purpose, the poor girl was thrown backwards with violence, and her head having come into contact with a stone or stump, the base of the brain was fractured, and instant insensibility followed, terminating in death. They attempted to resuscitate her, and thus occasioned the punctures on her face, but finding that the vital spark was fled, irrecoverably, to conceal their crime they threw her body into the river.

But blood will cry from the waters as from " the ground." A boy, a native of Wahoo, servant to Mrs. Hatheway, was the agent ol discovery and conviction. Much difficulty was experienced in obtaining an interpreter, but even this was overcome by the indefatigable exertions of Mr. Morgan, and the other persons connected with the Police.

Mr. Mason too, the Police Magistrate, was unceasing in his endeavours to elucidate this dark affair, and every friend of humanity must rejoice that their labours were successful. It appeared in evidence that Jane Saunders went down to the kitchen to pro-cure the heater of an Italian Iron, for the purpose of making up some things for her mistress ; while there she went into a closet adjoining, where a woman was with her, but on this part some obscurity rests.

The waiter, cook, and ostler, joined her there, and after a time she went into the garden with the waiter, who wanted to persuade her to go with him from the house ; she refused, when he took her by the arm ; she broke from him, he called his fellows in guilt to his assistance, and they forced the unwilling victim with them, and from that time she was seen no more until taken a mangled corpse from the dark bosom of the Derwent.

When they returned they seemed agitated, their faces flushed, their breathing thick and disturbed, like that of those engaged in some task laborious and terrible. They sat a while, and then separated, fancying perhaps that the crime was hidden. But " whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed." The eye that sleepeth not was upon them, and a poor and despised savage boy was the agent of discovery upon these bold bad christian men. When they went forth he followed, and hid himself, and there was a witness of their deeds.

He heard the persuasion, and saw the violence, until she was forced beyond his sight. While concealed the woman before alluded to came to chase him from his lair, and drive him with threats from his watch, but he contrived to elude her, and again concealed himself. When the men returned they felt uneasy at his cognizance and threatened to flog and throw him into the river, if he appeared to know anything they had done.

But the ways of Providence are inscrutable, and he who said vengeance is mine, I will repay it, can find his agent in the poorest and the meanest. The evidence of one witness was worthy of severe comment. Though warned in the most touching manner by Mr. Mason to declare the truth, and admonished against persistence in falsehood, with the most solemn imprecations the same story was repeated, and that story was a lie.

We shall doubtless be enabled to lay the whole particulars at length before our readers at the next criminal sessions. The necessity of obtaining the boy's evidence, and the speedy departure of the interpreter, will render delay impossible.

To be continued.....

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2022, 09:19:26 AM »
Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston, Tas. : 1835 - 1880), Wednesday 30 July 1845, page 29 newspaper reported the following.

NEW NORFOLK MURDER.

Thursday, July 24.

The Court House, as might be expected, was greatly crowded, in anticipation of hearing this long-protracted trial ; and a few moments after ten o'clock, his Honor Mr. Justice Montagu took his seat on the Bench, accompanied by the Sheriff, when the Court was immediately opened, and the prisoners were placed at the bar. Lockwood handed to his Honour a petition praying to be al lowed counsel for his defense.

The learned Judge directed the arraignment of the prisoners, when Isaac Lockwood, Thomas Gomm, and William Taylor, were charged with the wilful murder of Jane Saunders, at New Norfolk, on the 18th January last. The information, which measured, we should think, more than a yard in length, contained five counts, which, divested of technical verbiage, were substantially as follows:—1st, Charged the prisoners with choking and suffocating Jane Saunders, by covering her mouth with a handker chief. 2nd. With throwing and dashing her on the ground. 3rd. With smothering and suffocating her with their hands 4th. With the infliction of a mortal wound on the upper eyelid. 5th. With drowning her in the river Derwent. Each of the prisoners pleaded Not Guilty in a firm voice.

His Honor here, in reference to the petition for counsel, asked the prisoners, whether either of them wished to have the trial postponed ? Lockwood answered that they did not ; and his Honor said, that, under the circumstances of the case, he could not comply with their request ; cases had occurred where such a course was followed, but his Honor saw nothing in the present which would justify the expence which the Government would incur by de-fending the prisoners, Lockwood said, the circumstances under which he and the other prisoners were placed were very awful, and he was too ignorant to defend his own case.

His Honor, however refused to comply with the prayer of the petition, and the trial proceeded. The following were the jurors empanelled : — Messrs. J. Stevenson (foreman). Barfoot, Hutson, D. Kelly, H. Mills, H. Hurst, Montgomerie. B. Watford, H. Wilks, T. Holmes, A. Livingstone, and Joseph Lester. The Attorney General, as the prisoners were undefended would confine himself to a simple statement of the facts of the case ; and having done so, proceeded to call his witnesses by whose testimony these facts would be fully made known.

Mrs. Elwin deposed to the identity of Jane Saunders, and to her decease, the last time witness saw her alive was on the evening of the 18th January, coming from the kitchen fire with an iron in her hand: this was about a quarter past ten; Elizabeth Benwell, the housemaid was present, as was also Lockwood ; witness did not know where the other two prisoners were at that time ; the deceased went through the pantry, leading to the nursery; witness never saw her again ; she could have gone into the garden, or any where else. .

In consequence of some information, witness went from the nursery into the kitchen; this was about a quarter past eleven; Eliza Benwell was there, and Thomas Gomm and Isaac Lockwood ; witness asked if either of the men knew where Jane Saunders was ? they all said they did not. witness was not positive whether Taylor was in the kitchen or not ; he might have been. Lockwood was waiter, Gomm cook, and Taylor ostler.

Witness said, the girl was not in the habit of leaving the place, and if she had gone out, they must know where she had gone. They again said, they did not know. Witness said, then why do you not go and look for her; the two men said nothing, but got up and went out at the back door. Jane Saunders had been nearly four months at witness's house; witness thought that Thomas Gomm and the deceased appeared attached to each other.

By Lockwood.—Recollected that Lockwood was getting his tray ready in the pantry when the deceased went through the pantry ; besides this tray, Lockwood had another to prepare afterwards ; witness was at supper about 40 minutes, and did not require Lockwoods services during that time; Lockwood never missed answering the bell that evening ; it was near 11 o'clock when witness rang the bell. By Gomm.—At a quarter past 10, witness enquired for Gomm, but he was not then in the kitchen.

Taylor put no questions. Mr. Hathaway, the American Consul, was stopping at Mr. Elwin's Inn in January last, and was at home on the evening of the 18th January, Saunders had been in his service about six months ; witness last saw her alive in the early part of the evening of that day ; saw her dead at the inquest on the 21st ; she had charge of witness's child; witness was employed several hours during the night of the 18th in looking for Jane Saunders; first went in the rear of the house, and saw several persons ; did not recollect who they were; about an hour after, the prisoners accompanied witness searching for the deceased ; a Sandwich Island boy named Keo, was in witness's service ; but he never gave him in charge to Lockwood. There is a garden in the rear of the Inn, and beyond that a paddock, which leads to the River Derwent ; there is a ditch with a small bridge across on the way to the river.

The next morning witness had some conversation with Taylor on the subject witness said he thought Taylor must know, as he (witness) had heard he had been riding with her early the previous morning ; Taylor replied that he knew nothing about her ; witness had no further conversation with Taylor, or either of the other prisoners.

William Evans, a drover, was at Mr. Elwin's Inn on the evening of the 18th of January, with some sheep; witness stopped in the kitchen and occasionally visited the tap room ; witness went to bed about half past 11 , leaving the taproom about half past 10, and silting a good bit in the kitchen ; Lockwood and Gomm were there; and an elderly woman ; after witness bad been there a while, a young woman came for an iron ; Lockwood took the iron out of the fire and put it into a flat iron, which the young woman took away : witness heard no conversation ; the young woman went through the pantry, and Lockwood went out the same way about a minute after. Just after this, Gomm said he was going to make witness's bed and went up the stairs ; witness did not see him in the bedroom.

Eliza Benwell and witness's fellow-traveller were in the kitchen when Lockwood and Gomm left.and, he thought, Taylor. Lock wood returned to the kitchen before witness went to bed but Gomm had not then returned ; Lockwood came in, in a great bustle , and said be wanted Gomm  he (Lockwood) went up stairs and fetched him, and they both went into the pantry ; this was about ten minutes after witness saw the young woman go into the pantry ; witness sat in the kitchen a good bit after this : Taylor was in the kitchen at this time : Lockwood and Gomm returned to the kitchen before witness went to bed ; they had been absent about half an hour, to the beat of witness's knowledge ; Taylor was in the kitchen most of that time ; Lockwood and Gomm came back the same way as they went ; during the time they were out, Taylor was called away to a horse.

There was a black boy in the kitchen when Lockwood and Gomm went into the kitchen; he went out very soon after they went out, and came back before them ; the black boy was absent about five minutes ; he had not been out before since witness left the taproom : he wanted to go, but Lock wood would not let him, as he said he had charge of him from the American Consul.

The boy went out a second time in a very few minutes after he came in; he was absent five or ten minutes, and returned before Lockwood and Gomm ; Taylor came in soon after them, but not by the same way. When Lockwood returned, he sat down to cards with the black boy. Gomm sat on a stool : the black boy asked Lockwood where Jane was, but witness did not hear his answer. Gomm was then present ; Keo was in the kitchen when deceased came for the iron ; it was before this that Lockwood checked Keo about going out : witness met Gomm on the top of the stairs as he was going to bed ; Keo slept in the same room with witness and his fellow traveller that night.

Patrick Doolan.the ' fellow-traveller' of the last witness corroborated the main points of that witness's testimony ; he staterd also that, in going up to bed with Evans, he saw Lockwood and the servant woman (Eliza Benwell) in a room over the kitchen ; witness saw Taylor in bed the next morning, with his clothes on, in the same room.

In reply to questions by the Judge and the prisoners, no evidence of any import was elicited. Edward R. Wilson. — Was at Mr. Elwin's on the morning of the 19th January; saw the three prisoners, the servant woman, and two strangers in the kitchen ; a conversation then ensued, respecting the disappearance of the deceased, when some one suggested that she had run away with some person the night before?

Lockwood, however, said ' Not she, she is at the bottom of the bloody river ;' to this, no reply was made by any one present; Gomm might have heard — witness thought he could — what Lockwood said. Samuel Baverstock.— Resides at New Norfolk; was on the river in January last, the 19th ; on passing Mr. Elwin's jetty in a boat, I thought I saw something like a bundle at the bottom of the river ; went home to breakfast, and afterwards went to search with a constable, but the water being thick, they found nothing ; there are from 18 to 20 feet of water in that part of the river ; it was about 20 yards from Mr. Elgin's jetty; on the following day, and about the same place, witness hooked up the body of a young female whom he knew to be Mr. Hathaway's servant.

Witness took it to Mr. Elgin's inn ; there was a boat moored at Mr. Elwin's jetty when witness passed ; the depth of water at the jetty is from 6 to 8 feet in a high tide ; when witness took the body to Mr. Elwin's, he saw, with other persons, the prisoner Taylor, but he said nothing, nor witness to him. John Cawthorne, a ropemaker at New Norfolk.

 On the night of the 18th January, happened to be out " eeling' in his boat from half-past 7 to half-past 10 o'clock ; whilst witness was "eeling" he heard something in the bushes, by the river side, in Mr. Elwin's paddock, which he thought was Mr. Elwin's cattle : about five minutes after, witness heard a large splash in the water, which he thought was fish : the sound of the splash was in the direction of Mr. Elwin's jetty : witness was on the river, about eighty or one hundred yards from Mr. Elwin's jetty, close to the bushes ; witness then went home : heard the splash at about half-past eleven, or a little more, as near as he could tell. Mr. Elwin. — On the evening of the 18th of January, a gentleman named Parker, left witness's house at a quarter-past 11 or half-past 10 : he left on horseback : witness desired Taylor to get the horse ready, : Taylor was in the kitchen, with Lockwood and Eliza Benwell : the girl was not missed at this time : the travellers were not then in the kitchen.

it was an hour after Mr. Parker left, when witness first heard that the deceased was missing: did not know where Keo was, when Mr. Parker's horse was ordered : Taylor had no business in the room where the travellers slept ; Gomm and Lockwood ought to have slept in a room adjoining, but witness did not know whether they did sleep there ; witness went to bed at 2 a. m. : He last saw Lockwoad, very near that hour, in the parlour, [A plan of the house and premises was here shown to Mr. Elwin, and explained by him.] By Taylor.— Witness recollected Taylor bringing a lantern to him, Messrs. Hathaway and Campbell, Lockwood being present ; recollected the three prisoners coming from the river about half-past eleven, directly after the girl was missing; they were coming in a direction between the paddock and the garden.

 By his Honor. — Witness asked Taylor where he had been to ? he said be had been to look for the girl ; witness asked why he went to the river ? he said he did not know, but went because the others went ; the other two came up just as Taylor had finished the last sentence ; they came in a direct course from the river, and from the boat ; it takes three minutes and some seconds to go from the back gate

to the jetty; Taylor was just coming through the gate when witness met him ; witness said it was a strange thing to go to the river — they had better look about the place ; this was as nearly as witness could tell rather more than half past eleven ; there were no other persons about the river at that time except the prisoners ; witness's boat was at that time moored by the head to the jetty, so that her stern could have swung round about eight or ten yards. By Gomm — Witness did not recollect hearing Mrs, Elwin tell the men to go to the river ; she had never told him that she did so.

Keo was then called, and Mr. Howard being sworn as the intepreter, his examination proceeded as follows : — Was servant to Mr. Hathaway in January last, and Jane Saunders took care of the children; recollected when Jane Saunders was missing ; it was on a Saturday, and on the night of that day witness saw her with an iron in the kitchen ; the three prisoners were present, with Eliza Benwell and Jane Saunders, as was also witness ; in the evening he saw Gomm and Jane Saunders laughing and playing.

 Jane then went up stairs, and the waiter (Lockwood) soon followed her ; he soon after came down, and told the cook that the girl was gone into the yard ; the cook then asked whereabouts the girl was, and the waiter said she was in the garden; the next thing he saw was Eliza Benwell talking to Jane Saunders in the garden; witness was standing looking through a window up stairs; witness came down stairs, went into the yard, and saw the three men go out, and Jane went down to the garden gate.

The cook was down at the tree, and as the girl was walking along the fence, when opposite the tree the cook came from behind the tree, and took her by the arm, and pulled her towards the tree, when she struggled ; the cook then tried to kiss her, when she again resisted, but previous to this, she had often allowed him to do so, and only laughed at it ; after the kissing was over, the other two prisoners came up, and lifted her up by her arms ; while the kissing was going on, the other two men came from the stable; Gomm then took his black handkerchief, and put it over her face.

To be continued.....

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Re: Ghost Girl of the Bush Inn New Northfolk TAS
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2022, 09:20:03 AM »
Witness' attention was here drawn off by Eliza, who was in the garden, and when be looked again at the girl he saw her face, which was white, and about two inches of the handkerchief hanging out of her mouth ; witness then saw the cook put his hand over her month. (The witness here described the manner in which the hand was placed.) Lockwood had the deceased by her right arm with one hand, and Gomm by the left; Eliza Benwell was in the garden looking on, as shown in the plan.

(The plan was here exhibited to the jury, and the different positions of the several persons, as well as of the tree, marked by Keo with a pencil, pointed out by Mr. Howard .) The ostler, Taylor, was behind, supporting her ; afterwards, the prisoners dragged her along over a ditch towards the river, she having no motion; witness then got up a tree (shown on the plan), but while he was getting up he lost sight of the party ; when he got up, he saw the three men and the girl in the boat the girl was sitting on the gunwale of the boat, in the stern sheets, supported by the cook; Lockwood was in the fore part of the boat, and Tayfor near him ; witness saw the boat ' wabbling' on the water.

 The next thing he saw was the boat coming back from the middle of the stream ; it came alongside the bank, and the three men, without the girl came on shore. Eliza Benwell stood in the garden until they got the girl into the paddock, and nearly down to the river ; Eliza then went towards the stable, and waited till the men were returning, when she went direct to the house ; the men came up, and went to the house in the same way ; witness saw nothing more, and the men told him to be off to bed.

Eliza Benwell saw witness dodging about the place, and told him to go off to bed. When the men went towards the house, witness was still up the tree, and remained there till they went into the house ; witness saw them go in, and Eliza also, at the hall door. Witness, as soon as he saw the men safely in the house, got down from the tree, put on his shoes, and went into the house ; there were only the three prisoners and Eliza in the kitchen when witness went in.

Witness did not play cards; if any one said so, it was false; he was not playing that night, but had played two nights before ; be saw cards on the table that night; the men were playing cards that night (the 18th) — Lockwood and Gomm ; they were playing cards before the girl was killed, but not after wards. Witness did not speak to Lockwood when he came into the kitchen, nor to Gomm.

The first man witness saw coming from the river, was the cook. The greater part of the handkerchief was in the deceased's mouth, which filled out her cheeks very much. At this stage of the proceedings, his Honor desired that Eliza Benwell should be called, and on her making her appearance, she was sent away in custody.

Keo's examination resumed.— When the men were dragging the girl along, her head was hanging over her shoulder the whole distance, as far as witness could see. Before the handkerchief was put into her mouth, the deceased cried a little — she did not scream, but she whined ; when witness returned to the kitchen the cook asked him where he had been?

The night was brightly moonlight. The cook told witness that he had better mind what be was about, and to bear the cook out ; witness first told a con-stable what he had seen on the Sunday (the next day) ; when the kissing was going on by the tree, the deceased was sitting, but when they heard the others coming the cook jumped up, but the girl remained sitting.

 By his Honor.— The deceased did not kick or struggle when the handkerchief was in her mouth ; the girl's toes just touched the ground. As soon as they put the handkerchief in her month they took her to the boat ; She had neither bonnet nor cap on ; she did not stir, nor move a limb, after the men lifted her up ; before the handker chief was in her mouth, the deceased moved, but afterwards she was quite still.

By Lockwood. — Witness did not come into the kitchen with the two travellers ; he was in the kitchen, however, while they were there, but he did not leave it before they went to bed ; witness went up with the travellers, but did not go to sleep ; he did not remember Lockwood refusing to let him go out that evening, and still persisted that he did not play at cards ; the travellers were not tipsy.

Medical evidence was then adduced as to the cause of death, and Dr. Weston was examined at great length on this point. This witness stated, after much circumlocution that in his opinion the death of the deceased was caused by the extravasation of blood on the brain. Dr. Bedford, as a kind of amicus curia, and who had been in the Court daring the trial, was examined, and the result of his testimony was to the effect that the deceased might have died of the extravasation, but if she had been only stunned by a blow on her head, suffocation by drowning or otherwise might have taken place.

The examination of these gentleman occupied a consider able time, and at its conclusion the prisoners wished Keo's deposition before the Coroner to be read. Keo was then recalled, and Mr. Howard, the interpreter, requested to explain its nature to him. Questions were then put by Mr Howard to Keo relative to the depositions, by which, how ever, nothing of consequence was elicited, beyond what Keo bad already stated. He said, however, that he told Baker that Lockwood and Gomm had threatened to throw him into the river if he said any thing about the matter.

The case for the Crown being closed, the learned Judge called upon the prisoners respectively for their defence, when each put in a short written statement, purporting to be a description of the manner in which each had been occupied on the night in question, and with a view to show that they could not have been present at the murder; they all stated, that, on being told by Mrs. Elwin Jane was missing, they went in search of her.

The prisoner Gomm wished Eliza Benwell to be examined, and on being placed in the box, this witness was strictly cautioned by the learned Judge, as to the evidence she was about to give : his Honor told her that if she should be tried ' for this murder,' her answers would be taken down, and used against her : she would not be compelled to answer any questions to her prejudice : but she must not think that, by doing so she would be exempt from the consequences.

Eliza Benwell — Recollected Jane Saunders being missing : witness knew nothing about her death : saw Jane Saunders that night in the garden and paddock : Gomm made a bed for the two travellers (Evans and Doolan) : he (Gomm) went out between 9 and 10 o'clock that night: witness did not see him afterwards in the kitchen reading a book. In answer to a question from the Attorney-General, this witness stated that between ten and eleven she was up stairs making the beds.

Mrs. Elwin was recalled by his Honor ; she stated that Taylor bad not told her that either Gomm or Lockwood proposed to let loose the large dog ; there was nothing said about a dog ; the cook and waiter generally wore black hand-kerchiefs ; when witness returned from the river, she could not say whether Gomm had on a black handkerchief or not ; the next day he did wear one.

The learned Judge now addressed the jury, which he did at great length, and with exceeding care and clearness. His Honor first explained the several counts to the jury, accompanying his explanation with the necessary remarks. The recapitulation of the evidence, which necessarily occu-pied a long time, was given with great pains, and the different points placed lucidly before the jury.

The conduct of the woman, Eliza Benwell, was severely deprecated, and her trial as an accessary peremtorily directed. The cause of death, as shown by the medical witnesses, was suffocation, there being no wound on the body sufficiently severe to prove mortal, and it was obvious from that testimony that death must have ensued previously to her immersion in the river.

With respect to the evidence of the boy Keo, his Honor laid great stress upon it, and observed that if the jury believed him, the case was conclusive. They had an opportunity of seeing him in the box, and could they doubt that he was the witness of truth ? His Honor also paid a well merited compliment to the straightforward and intelligent manner in which Keo gave his evidence.

The learned Judge concluded his very able and elaborate charge shortly after eleven o'clock, when the jury retired to their chamber, and in about half an hour returned into Court with a verdict of Guilty against all the prisoners on the first count.

On being called up for sentence, each declared his innocence; and his Honor, in an impressive address, severely reprehended such hardihood ; the utmost care and pains bad been bestowed upon their case, no less by the law officers of the crown, than by the patient and prolonged attention of the jury ; and his Honor implored them to discard from their minds all hope whatever of any mitigation of the dreadful sentence he was about to pass upon them Their sojourn in this world would be but brief, very brief, for, perhaps within a week, they would appear in the presence of their Maker. His Honor conjured them, therefore, to employ the short time which was left therm, in supplicating for that mercy which could not be extended to them in this world. His Honor then passed sentence of death against the prisoners, and ordered their bodies to be dissected and anatomized.

Thus terminated this important trial — a trial which, more than any we ever recollect in this Colony, has created an excitement amongst all classes of the community, no less from the age and sex of the unfortunate victim, than from the several collateral circumstances connected with it. And never did we witness a trial more carefully or more ably conducted in any court of justice, and, if the attendance of a multitude be any criterion of its deep and exciting interest, this trial was especially so, as the court was densely crowded from its commencement to its close, at nearly mid-night, We must not omit to notice the admirable manner in which the boy Keo gave his evidence, and the able and in-intelligent manner in which it was interpreted by Mr. Howard, who, as we said in our last, is a perfect proficient in the boy's native language, : by this, much time was saved, while the answers were so clear at to convey to all who heard them a complete view — so to speak — of the dreadful transaction. More than once, a buzz of approbation broke from the crowd, during this interesting examination.

Col. Times.

Kanacki

 


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