Author Topic: Unsolved Norfolk Island murder  (Read 5485 times)

Offline Christine

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Unsolved Norfolk Island murder
« on: July 04, 2005, 10:42:13 AM »
Hi everyone,

anyone who has ever visited the beautiful of Norfolk would have been appalled at having hear about a murder there some years ago that remains unsolved to this day. I was reading some information about it on the web.

Here is an extract from a new book coming out about the murder.

Nightmare on Norfolk
Norm Lipson & Adam Walters


On Easter Sunday 2002, on an afternoon of torrential rain, a young woman died on Norfolk Island in a horrific manner. Janelle Louise Patton suffered 64 wounds, the deepest of which left her bleeding to death.

Hardened convicts removed to the island from the Australian mainland in the 18th century had considered Norfolk a hell on earth and had prayed for death; for Janelle Patton, Norfolk had been paradise, and it is likely that she had prayed on that holiday afternoon for her life to be spared. (you radiate sunshine and light)pit Waterfall Reserve is a must-see for the thousands of visitors to the island each year. On Sunday, 31 March, New Zealand tourists Helen Opie and Mark De La Roche were eager to take advantage of the dwindling light of daylight saving. As they walked towards the clifftop overlooking Cascade Bay, the couple noticed what must have looked like a large bag of rubbish dumped near one of several, large concrete slabs embedded in this idyllic spot. On closer inspection, the couple were shocked to discover the body of a young woman. They could see her long, dark hair and white runners protruding from the sheet of black plastic in which she had been wrapped.

At 6.33 pm a distressed Helen Opie called Norfolk Island police to report that she and her partner had stumbled across a woman\'s body in the reserve. By 7.56 pm, under the eerie glare of artificial lighting, a medical examiner pronounced life to be extinct.

Just minutes earlier, at 7.50 pm, Special Constable Brendan Anderson, who was manning the police station, took a call from a tourist identifying himself as Ron Patton, from Sydney. He said that he and his wife were staying at the Panorama Apartments, and that their daughter, Janelle, who lived on Norfolk, was missing. She hadn\'t been seen since late that morning when she set out for a walk to Queen Elizabeth Lookout. A police canvass of the homes along Rooty Hill Road would later establish that Janelle was probably attacked and abducted at about 11.45 am.

Janelle Patton was an attractive young woman with long, dark hair and a feisty character; she wasn\'t someone who was afraid to stand by her principles or to speak her mind. Most people knew her as a committed member of the community, with a strong work ethic, concern for the welfare of others, an outspoken nature and a passionate zest for life. But at just 29 years of age, Janelle\'s life was viciously taken. Judging by the brutality of the attack and the extent of the injuries - a fractured skull, fractured ribs, dislocated ankle, multiple stab wounds to many parts of her body, head injuries, and numerous bruises and lacerations, someone - or several people - must have despised her. The task that faced police investigators was to learn just who that person - or persons - might be.

On the evening that Janelle Patton\'s body was found, Detective Sergeant Bob Peters, a sworn member of the Norfolk Island Police who was based in the Australian Capital Territory at the time, was notified of the murder and instructed to go to the island at the earliest opportunity to provide support and assistance to the local police.

Peters and his team would come to know Janelle Patton very well through the course of their long investigation into her murder. Although they had never met her in life, they would know very much about her in death. The question was: what was it about Janelle that had caused someone to murder her so viciously? Their belief that Janelle\'s killer was among the 2,081 residents of Norfolk was only strengthened by the obstacles they encountered while seeking cooperation from the locals.

In March 2003, a $50,000 reward was offered to anyone with information leading to an arrest and conviction. At the same time, a conditional indemnity from prosecution was offered for any accomplice not directly involved in Janelle\'s death. By August 2003 that reward would be increased to $100,000. Twelve months later it would be trebled, but the cash has not been enough to crack the wall of silence. No one wanted to talk. The guard wasn\'t going up just to protect relatives and friends. It was almost as if the integrity of the island itself depended on the erection of an impenetrable wall of silence.

In April 2004, after more than two years of rumour and innuendo, Janelle Patton\'s parents heard for themselves at a coronial inquiry into their daughter\'s death the facts unearthed by the police investigation. It was obvious to Ron and Carol Patton, as they listened to every detail of the post-mortem examination being read out, that their daughter had suffered prolonged pain. Who could have inflicted such violent injuries on her?

Coroner Ron Cahill was at pains to point out to the spectators and media who had gathered for the occasion that 16 \'persons of interest\' who were to be named at the inquest could not be described as suspects in the absence of enough forensic evidence to directly link them to the murder, although he was quick to add: \'They will remain under scrutiny after the inquest.\'

Carol Patton\'s faith in the thoroughness of the police investigation has rarely wavered, but she has never underestimated the toughness of the challenge of penetrating the island\'s wall of silence. \'To the person who committed this crime, we say you are a coward who has lost their right to remain within the midst of normal, caring people. At the moment you are free, but be warned: there is no statute of limitations for the crime of murder, and the police will seek you till the end of your days.\'


Surely someone on that Island knows something? It is a small place and a tightknit community that is really a very extended family.
You only need to look at the way the Pitcairn Island child abuse affair was covered up and justified by the residents to know that the Police were never going to be offered too much help.

So perhaps we can focus our attentions on the spirit of Janelle and see if there is any messages from her that may help?

Thanks
Christine
If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, we have at least to consider the possibility that we have a small aquatic bird of the family anatidae on our hands.
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Offline catseyes

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Unsolved Norfolk Island murder
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2005, 11:58:25 AM »
Hi Christine, I think that this murder will never be solved by the police.  From what I remember a very well known Island personality was implicated along with his son I think.  ( I wish I had a better memory!LOL)  Everyone living on the island is related to everyone else.

I saw a something once on the ghosts that haunt the island, I think it might have been on Warrick Moss' show, but there seem to be an awful lot of ghosts doing their thing amonst the living!

I hope they re-run Warrick again, this time I'll be ready with the video!!!


Offline Christine

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Warwick Moss
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2005, 08:01:53 PM »
Hi Catseyes,
I love that show too. I missed half of it though. I would ideally love to have a lending library on here where we can swap those sorts of show etc. It would be great if they re-ran it.
I can't help but feel this murder was committed by someone on the island and it has just been covered up. Not all of the men on the island consented to DNA tests which I think is suss. Surely if you had nothing to hide you'd consent?
Christine
If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, we have at least to consider the possibility that we have a small aquatic bird of the family anatidae on our hands.
Douglas Adams


Offline catseyes

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Unsolved Norfolk Island murder
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2005, 12:27:46 AM »
You would think that if you were inocent you would want to be tested to prove you were innocent!  Would it be a little harsh of me to suggest that maybe the inbreeding has caused a few psycological disorders?


Offline Christine

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Pitcairn island
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2005, 04:20:43 PM »
Hi,
you only have to look at the whole Pitcairn Island child abuse cover up to see the extent of inbreeding.
Basically the community accepts menfolk having sex with young girls as their right and that it is perfectly accpetable. the court disagreed recently and sent two of them to gaol.
Inbred blood and inbred mentaility unfortunately. I would give DNA to clear my name no problem.
Christine
If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, we have at least to consider the possibility that we have a small aquatic bird of the family anatidae on our hands.
Douglas Adams


 


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